And here we take shelter

blasternation:

10/10 textures, From Software. 

Been wondering about this shit for a while now. What the hell are those pillars supposed to be? The texture looks like they had a spooky painting image and they just stretched it across the model…

Setuo Yamamoto, Makoto Tomozawa, Yuki Iwai, Yuko Takehara, Toshihiko Horiyama - Boomer Kuwanger Stage
398 plays

paintedpixels:

Boomer Kuwanger Stage
Mega Man X
SNES
Toshihiko Horiyama, Setsuo Yamamoto, Yuki Iwai, Yuko Takehara 

Cr1TiKaL - Rematch
1,800 plays
humanoidhistory:


Behold the Horizon Observatory on the peak of the Halde Hoheward, a rehabilitated slag heap near the town of Herten in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. According to the observatory’s website: “On the plateau of the Halde Hoheward’s summit, approximately 100 m higher than the surrounding, the horizon observatory was created in 2008. It consists of a circular plane with a diameter of 80 m and two large arcs of 43 m and 45 m radius that span this plane. The surface of the plane is absolutely horizontal and is the perfect mathematical horizon for an observer located at its centre.”

humanoidhistory:

Behold the Horizon Observatory on the peak of the Halde Hoheward, a rehabilitated slag heap near the town of Herten in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. According to the observatory’s website: “On the plateau of the Halde Hoheward’s summit, approximately 100 m higher than the surrounding, the horizon observatory was created in 2008. It consists of a circular plane with a diameter of 80 m and two large arcs of 43 m and 45 m radius that span this plane. The surface of the plane is absolutely horizontal and is the perfect mathematical horizon for an observer located at its centre.”

benjiecon:

unbalancedfox:

go away, golbat! it’s a secret!

benjiecon:

unbalancedfox:

go away, golbat! it’s a secret!

image

thebrownhatter:

uncle-oli:

Since I don’t have a good singing voice I’ll just leave you with this ethan.

THANK

america-wakiewakie:


World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera
Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.
In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.
It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.
The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.
But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.
In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

america-wakiewakie:

World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera

Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.

In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.

It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.

The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.

But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.

In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

witchbat:

nerd

witchbat:

nerd

ourvaluedcustomers:

To her friend…

ourvaluedcustomers:

To her friend…

randomlovesawkward:

"Badass Versions of Beloved Characters"

by Sylvain Sarrailh: http://tohad.deviantart.com/